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Book Review: Made in India, by Biddu

Non-fiction is not my favorite genre to read, or to review, but there are times when I make an exception. When I read the title of a book and a song comes to mind, it’s interesting. When I find out that that song was his work, then I’m curious to know more about him, and I read on. Maybe it’s the urge to know more that actually makes the biography or autobiography interesting. Continue reading “Book Review: Made in India, by Biddu”

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Book Review: The Curse of Brahma, by Jagmohan Bhanver

Mythology is a genre that I love a lot. The stories of gods and demons, triumph of good over evil, they are something that I’ve been given a steady diet of from childhood. They are what I fondly discuss with my grandparents even these days. When a series, or a trilogy as is so common these days, is based on one of those well known plots/characters, it raises expectations, the first one being “Will it be able to recreate the magic in some way?” Continue reading “Book Review: The Curse of Brahma, by Jagmohan Bhanver”

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Book Review: Arcane Rhapsodies, by Navya Jain

Poetry is a genre not every reader veers toward. They find it difficult to understand, perhaps, or don’t see the story in it. For a poet though, a poem is about telling a story, and one that speaks to their heart. This book is a bit of both, for with Arcane Rhapsodies, the poet Navya Jain brings stories from mythology to life in verse. And some that were new to me, the mythology genre lover. The cover art itself is quite beautiful, and the only thing I wished was that the title and poet’s name was more prominent. Continue reading “Book Review: Arcane Rhapsodies, by Navya Jain”

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Book Review: Pupil’s President APJ Abdul Kalam, edited by Satyam Roychowdhury

“Death ends a life, not a relationship.”

These words from Mitch Albom’s book Tuesdays with Morrie are so true. The strength of a relationship – be it love, friendship, or any other – doesn’t dwindle with death. The memories that were created previously in life linger for long, and it makes the presence of that person still felt, still so prominent in life. It holds true for the relationship between a teacher and his student as well. The lessons that have been taught stay for long, and with them, I do not feel that that person has truly gone. Continue reading “Book Review: Pupil’s President APJ Abdul Kalam, edited by Satyam Roychowdhury”