Posted in Books

Book Review: We Need New Names, by NoViolet Bulawayo

When a book is shortlisted for an award, the fact that it is good is known. A jury of critics wouldn’t select the book for an award if there wasn’t some facet of it that was worth the nomination. An award-shortlisted book makes me ask the questions, “Is the nomination deserving?” and “What was that facet which helped it get the nomination?” Sometimes, both questions feel the same. After all, one might say that it was that facet which made it deserving of a nomination, right? Continue reading “Book Review: We Need New Names, by NoViolet Bulawayo”

Posted in Books

Book Review: A Calamitous Chinese Killing, by Shamini Flint

Humor in crime fiction is something that I feel is difficult to execute. If the humor becomes too much and overwhelms the crime, the genre loses out on something special. The detective’s character is what makes this mix successful or otherwise. Recently, I had read Tarquin Hall, and his central character, Vish Puri is one such delightful detective. When this book fell into my lap, I was expecting another such character. Continue reading “Book Review: A Calamitous Chinese Killing, by Shamini Flint”

Posted in Books

Book Review: The Other Side of the Table, by Madhumita Mukherjee

I’ve always felt that there is no dearth of love stories in Indian literature. I’ve wondered about the same and how a good book in that genre must be to stand out of the umpteen others it competes with on the bookshelves. We don’t get time to know the book before we buy it. So it’s a spot none of us might like to be in. Continue reading “Book Review: The Other Side of the Table, by Madhumita Mukherjee”

Posted in Books

(Book Review) D: Ten Years. Two Lives. One Café, by Aniruddha Mahale

Sometimes a book jumps out at you for one reason… that’s the cover. It makes you think of what unfolds in the book. It stays in your head even if you don’t buy the book immediately, like a reminder… “Remember me? You loved me at first sight. Won’t you come back and buy me soon?” Funny but true, that’s what a good cover does. Continue reading “(Book Review) D: Ten Years. Two Lives. One Café, by Aniruddha Mahale”

Posted in Books

Book Review: Selected Poems, by Rabindranath Tagore (Translated by William Radice)

There are certain poets you look up to for some poems they wrote. I admire Davies’ for his poem Leisure which is my all-time favorite, and Nick Virgilio for his lily haiku, which has the most wonderful depth in three lines. Then there is Tagore, who I admire for his poetry collection Gitanjali. I find it humbling that people tease me with his name, because my surname is very similar to his. Continue reading “Book Review: Selected Poems, by Rabindranath Tagore (Translated by William Radice)”