Book Review: Clod Makes a Friend, by David J Pedersen

Children tend to believe something a guide/mentor tells them. They’re young, and cannot really understand that each person has their own magic within them. This book takes that idea in a literal sense.

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Book Review: The Man Who Robbed His Own Post Office, by Jeffrey Archer

There are quite a few short stories from Jeffrey Archer which have been released as single short books, possibly to create interest in the larger collection. This was one I recently came across, and is originally from the collection Cat O’ Nine Tales.

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Book Review: Carthick’s Unfairy Tales, by TF Carthick

I think most of us would have grown up reading fairy tales, and would still love rereading them, or reading them to children. There’s that feel good factor in them that makes them enjoyable and makes us happy. When I read the title Unfairy Tales, I was wondering what I was in for with this read.

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Book Review: My Name is Alex, by Jean Spraker

The power of the written word is such that it draws attention. The words accepted by some, ignored by some and at times, protested against by some. But we do forget that it is knowledge, useful to few people. Yes, words can incite extreme reactions, but to burn books is to burn knowledge, and that would definitely be cause for alarm.

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Book Review: Wonder, by R. J. Palacio

“When given the choice between being right or being kind, choose kind.” This quote from Wayne Dyer makes a lot of sense, but most people forget it. After all, if they’re right, why shouldn’t they say so, right? It makes a lot of difference, actually.

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Book Review: Lord of the Flies, by William Golding

Too much of anything can be bad. Maybe that’s why people seek balance. But how much is the right amount? And who decides? To what extent can rules create amicable living, before a feeling of “being chained by rules” takes over and we want to break free of them?

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