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Book Review: Aavarana – The Veil, by S L Bhyrappa

Some books come to light because of the story. Some come to light because of the beautiful cover design. Some books even come to light purely by chance, or by the name of the author. But there are few books which come to light because of the controversy the story creates. Continue reading “Book Review: Aavarana – The Veil, by S L Bhyrappa”

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Book Review: The Emperor’s Riddles, by Satyarth Nayak

A few years back, when I was in college, one of the events of our fest was a treasure hunt. Start with the first clue, and then look for the second whose location is revealed by the first, the third from the second and so on till the final one that leads us to the treasure which was a glass vase (and our prize). Imagine if a treasure hunt of such proportions was to be put into motion by a murder, and the end reveals the answers to the mystery of the murder and other questions. It is such a premise that is put across by the novel, The Emperor’s Riddles. Continue reading “Book Review: The Emperor’s Riddles, by Satyarth Nayak”

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Book Review: Far Beyond The Dead End, by Saikat Baksi

There are very few historical fictions which have managed to keep me engaged. The catch to a historical thriller is that it must accomplish two things… firstly, transport me to the time in the past and paint that scene vividly; secondly, it must keep me glued to it to know what is going to happen in the next page. As with any thriller, there are two kinds. One that starts out with action and keeps that throughout the novel; and the other blends both detail and thrill. With “Far Beyond the Dead End”, Saikat Baksi brings out a novel of the latter kind, but one that is a love story more than anything else. Continue reading “Book Review: Far Beyond The Dead End, by Saikat Baksi”

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Book Review: The Almond Tree, by Michelle Cohen Corasanti

Imagine this: you are a young boy living in a war-torn area with your family, and the opposition controls your village. You don’t like it, but still live in peace with your family, happy in their love and care, happy with little things that are more memorable like the quirks of your siblings than the fear of landmines from the enemy. But one dreaded evening, something happens, something that breaks your heart, but are still forced to live on. How would you feel? Angry, torn, sad, vengeful, panicked, hurt that some people do not want to do anything about the injustice that has been dealt to you? I did imagine myself in such a position, because frankly, that was the only way that I could feel and understand the protagonist of this novel. I had to step into his shoes, and that was one of the hardest things to do given his situation. Continue reading “Book Review: The Almond Tree, by Michelle Cohen Corasanti”

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(Book Review) Gods, Kings and Slaves: The Siege of Madurai, by R Venketesh

Indian culture and history is so vast, to use that as a platform to jump into a fiction is something that many authors are doing nowadays. But very few have taken the leap from doing Indian historical fiction to doing South Indian historical fiction. As in explore the history of South India too. Last year, I did read two such books. Continue reading “(Book Review) Gods, Kings and Slaves: The Siege of Madurai, by R Venketesh”