Book Review: The Conspiracy at Meru, by Shatrujeet Nath

When it comes to sequels, the book has to be just as amazing as the previous book in the series, if not better. I’ve awaited this book, The Conspiracy at Meru, ever since I finished reading the first book, The Guardians of the Halahala. The author, thankfully, had the patience to withstand my constant enquiry on the release date of this book. Two years after I reviewed the first, I finally put my thoughts to words on this sequel.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Conspiracy at Meru, by Shatrujeet Nath”

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Book Review: Shattered Dreams (Ramayana – The Game of Life #2), by Shubha Vilas

shattered_dreams_shubha_vilasI had my reservations to move to the second part of this series, because the first book was not to my liking. But the genre of mythology and Indian mythology interests me, so I thought I’d dig in to the book anyways. The series continues from where Rise of the Sun Prince leaves it.

I’m not quite sure why, but in this book the emotions feel truer, and it helped me to understand a bit more about the Ramayana than I knew before. Sometimes, reading the book and then going to the notation, it felt like I was sitting in a session of a Ramayana class, but not as boring as it might seem. Each character seemed to me, more than what I’ve heard of and understood in the first part, or before from life. The details are lovely, and the explanations, apt.

I like that there are lesser footnotes in this part, which helped it to feel unlike a text book. But that part still irritates me actually. As a reader, I tend to go with the flow, and that the story leaves before the end of the page is not noticed at certain times. I feel it might have been good to have it at the end of the story.

Shattered Dreams is certainly an improvement on Rise of the Sun Prince. I might re-read the two back to back again, and perhaps then, the series might seem better than what it did on the first read.


The Bookworm Rates This: 3/5
The Bookworm Rates This: 3/5
Book Details
Title: Shattered Dreams Series: Ramayana: The Game of Life #2
Author(s): Shubha Vilas Genre: Mythology
ISBN/ASIN: 9788184955316 Publisher: Jaico Publishers
No. of Pages: 404 Price: Rs. 350

Reviewed for the publisher, in exchange for a review copy. The views expressed here are my own, frank and uninfluenced.


(© 24th February 2015)

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Book Review: Rise of the Sun Prince (Ramayana – The Game of Life #1), by Shubha Vilas

There are many tales from Indian mythology that are treasured and told when young. One such tale is the Ramayana. I remember having heard it as a child, and watched it on television too. It’s one of those tales that are memorable. Each time I read it, it seems different yet the same.

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Rise of the Sun Prince, by Shubha Vilas attempts to retell the tale, and in the author’s own style. And it succeeds in that. The first thing that appeals is the wonderful cover design. Another thing that I liked from the book was that it was well researched. The effort that the author puts into the book is seen by the footnotes at almost every page. For someone who wants to know more about the great epic, without actually reading the original (though I don’t know if that’s possible), this book would be a good add to their bookshelf.

What I expected from the book when I took it was something that keeps the magic of mythology at its core. This book however is not one to take for that. For my imagination, this book felt more like a textbook, with those notations below. Sometimes going up to half the page, it kind of hampered the read, I felt. That was, of course, in addition to the language which felt heavy.

I summarize it as a book for those who want to delve into the Ramayana almost as research.


The Bookworm Rates This: 2/5
The Bookworm Rates This: 2/5
Book Details
Title: Rise of the Sun Prince Series: Ramayana: The Game of Life #1
Author(s): Shubha Vilas Genre: Mythology
ISBN/ASIN: 9788184955309 Publisher: Jaico Publishers
No. of Pages: 252 Price: Rs. 250

Reviewed for the publisher, in exchange for a review copy. The views expressed here are my own, frank and uninfluenced.


(© 20th February 2015)

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Book Review: The Guardians of the Halahala, by Shatrujeet Nath

Mythology is a genre I’ve grown up reading, and hearing, thanks in no small part to my grandmother. The tales of monarchs & avatars, and devas & asuras are still vivid in my mind. Two tales that have managed to keep me engrossed as well as make me thoughtful are that of the Samudramanthan, churning of the ocean by devas and asuras for the nectar of immortality, Amrit; and the tales of Vikram-Betaal. I’ve wondered how the former brought out even divine beings like the winged horse, Ucchaishrava or the white elephant Airavata; and the latter of course, made me contemplate the answers to Betaal’s questions before Vikrama answered them. It was with much eagerness that I stepped into a tale woven combining the two events — The Guardians of the Halahala, by Shatrujeet Nath.

Continue reading “Book Review: The Guardians of the Halahala, by Shatrujeet Nath”

Book Review: Aisle Be Damned, by Rishi Piparaiya

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About the author:
Rishi Piparaiya is an over-worked and over-traveled corporate executive based in the skies, 38000 feet over India. (No kidding! This is from the back cover!)

Cover art:
An airhostess in red uniform headed down the aisle dominates the cover. A small red airplane zooming around her is quite a nice touch. The book I feel will be humorous, but I wonder if it’ll interest me, a non-flyer as compared to harassed flyers (frequent or otherwise).

My thoughts on the book:
Ok. So this book lands up with no prior notice. The only thing I know is that it’s from the publisher, but I have no recollection of having requested the book. The title hadn’t felt that appealing in the list of released books that I had got earlier, and I wasn’t sure if I wanted to read it or not. Like I said, the thought of me inside an airplane itself is quite humorous, so the thought of me reading a book on airplane humor, that felt beyond humorous. It went back in my list of to be read books, but got a promotion recently, because I seem to be in a humor rush. This is the fourth or fifth book that is in the humor genre that I’ve read in the last month alone.

The only inkling I have of flying is that I took a flight to Cochin way back in 1998 (or thereabouts), forgot to put cotton in my ears and ended up spending a day or two after with a sonic sound in my ears. That’s the end of my air adventure. Nothing after that. Nil. Nada. Zip! Fortunately or unfortunately, this book turned out to be kind of my second air adventure, but in the warm confines of my bed, rather than 38000 feet up in the air inside a metal contraption. Aisle be damned if I ever put the tips and experiences given by Rishi in Aisle Be Damned to use, but I did find a dose of fresh humor in the book; especially the pictures and the captions. The first one, with the security check triggering an alarm… that one got me laughing out loud. How he builds up to the picture is quite interesting too.

This is one of those books, which even after reading, I can’t tell what to better. If I knew what to tell I would, but I don’t, so I’ll not make things up. (Not my style!) This is a book for those who go on flights, and they would be able to understand or relate to this book far more than I have been able to. The author has a funny bone, I grant you that, and he does succeed in making me laugh. Maybe I’ll re-read it if/when I have a few flight journeys under my belt.


Rated a 6/10
Rated a 6/10

Book Details:
Title: Aisle Be Damned
Author: Rishi Piparaiya
ASIN: 9788184954654
Genre: Non-fiction / Humor
Publishers: Jaico Books
Price: INR. 250

 


This book was given to me for review by Jaico Books. This is not a paid review.
The opinions expressed in the review are my own, and remain unbiased and uninfluenced.


Shared with
1) First Reads Challenge at b00k r3vi3ws
2) Indian Quills Reading Challenge at Tales Pensieve.


(19th Nov, 2013)

Book Review: Day is Night, by J R Jyoti

day_is_night

My thoughts on the book:
Humor is not a genre I take lightly. I know very few authors who can actually do that genre justice. So when a book promises to tickle the funny bones, I expect laughs, not chuckles. Okay. I’d adjust with more laughs and a few chuckles thrown in. But nothing less. This book, Day is Night, promises humorous stories on the cover itself. Unfortunately, the book doesn’t deliver. Neither were they stories, nor humorous. I could say they were satirical to a certain extent, but it was just a collection of 62 thoughts the author must have had in his mind. They are expressed as they are. The ending of each thought sometimes gets a chuckle, but the reader has to go through a couple of pages of rant to get there. Oddly enough, the book has no about page for the author. We do get to know him a little through the preface, but no specific page, not even a paragraph. I’d picked this book expecting a lot. Sad to say, I’m feeling let down.


Rated 4/10
Rated 4/10

Book Details:
Title: Day is Night
Author: J. R. Jyoti
ISBN: 9798179926320
Genre: Humor
Publishers: Jaico Books
Price: INR 175

 


This book was given to me for review by Jaico Books. This is not a paid review.
The opinions expressed in the review are my own, and remain unbiased and uninfluenced.


Shared with
1) First Reads Challenge at b00k r3vi3ws
2) Indian Quills Reading Challenge at Tales Pensieve.


(15th Nov, 2013)